Parma Young Professionals showcase Ukrainian Village murals

Many beautiful murals can be seen throughout Ukrainian Village in Parma, Ohio.

State Meats has served up Ukrainian sausages and other specialties for more than forty years.  So it seems the perfect place to display a mural welcoming all to Ukrainian Village.”

Lviv International Food Store is home of delicious European food, drinks and dessert. It’s also home to some beautiful vinyl film wall art, provided by Brunswick company Inflatable Images.”

“The site of the old Parma Lock Service displays another view of Ukraine from Inflatable Images. These vinyl works were paid for with government-issued grants for city improvements.”

Good Olde Daze has served Parma food and drinks for more than 25 years. Its scene of  the Ukranian city of Lviv is the final piece of the government-funded art on State Road. Former Mayor Dean DePiero said aesthetic improvements such as these capitalize on Parma’s strong ethnic heritage and make the city more attractive to people and businesses.”

Many others can also be seen when driving, walking, or riding your bike on State Rd.

Continue reading: https://parmayps.com/2017/07/30/take-the-parma-murals-tour/

Parma ranked third on list of ‘Overlooked Dream Cities’

Parma is considered an overlooked dream city by consumer data company GoodCall. The company’s report described Parma as one of the safest cities in the country.

“…people are discovering what Parma residents already know – the city is a great place to live and work.”

Parma was one of only four Ohio cities to make the top 100.

Continue reading at: http://www.cleveland.com/parma/index.ssf/2017/03/parma_ranked_third_on_list_of.html

Parma’s Ukrainian Village highlighted as neighborhood that is growing stronger, respects its past

Interesting new article highlighting the unique character of Parma’s Ukrainian Village, from the perspective of George Mount, a new Parma resident:

There’s an effort in Cleveland to recreate what it once was: a city of integrated neighborhoods valuing culture, family, and civic pride. But I often feel no sense of continuity with the past in these urban enclaves. Few of the hippest restaurants and coffee shops have been around for more than a few years. Emblematic of this difficulty to integrate the past are posh condominiums repurposed from closed schools and factories.

It’s great to breathe new life into these structures, but unfortunate that many longtime residents, likely alumni of West Tech or long-ago Eveready employees, can’t afford these luxury dwellings. This fracturing could make you wonder: can the neighborhoods of Cleveland grow stronger while respecting the past?

I believe the answer is “yes,” and the proof is right over the 480 bridge at State Road. It’s a place many urban pioneers reactively call the opposite of cool…

…Ukrainian Village, on the town’s northern border, is a classic inner-ring suburban neighborhood. Unlike many others, it is livable in its own right, proving that there is a way to combine old-world customs, livable neighborhoods, and affordable housing.

(excerpted from The Cleveland Neighborhood Guidebook )

Read the entire article at: http://beltmag.com/opposite-cool-parmas-ukrainian-village/