JOIN THE FESTIVITIES! 10TH ANNUAL UKRAINIAN VILLAGE PARADE IS AUGUST 24, 2019

When: August 24, 2019

10 a.m. groups gather at State Road School lot
11 a.m. parade step off on State Road

Where: The parade route is on State Road, beginning at the State Road School lot to
Ukrainian Heritage Park.

How do I take part: Click here to download the parade participation form.
Please return it to Ukrainian Village Committee via mail or email by July 31, 2019.

Email: ukrainianvillageparade@gmail.com
Mail: PO Box 34084, Parma, Ohio 44134

Why: It’s a fun community event in the heart of Parma! Also you can win a prize! Once
again this year, we will be awarding a distinction to the most creative and colorful
participant in the parade. We encourage all participants to create floats, decorate cars,
and wear costumes and uniforms that are relevant to their specific organization or group.

Preparation: On Friday, August 16, 2019, a meeting will be held with representatives of
the participating parade units. The meeting will be at St. Josaphat Ukrainian Catholic
Cathedral Annex Building at 7:00 p.m. At this time, unit representatives will receive detailed parade instructions including their assigned staging area.

Point of Contact: If you need to speak with us directly, call or text Roman (614) 425-1309.

Email: ukrainianvillageparade@gmail.com
Facebook: https://facebook.com/UkrainianVillage

Thank you for supporting this major City of Parma annual event!

If you know of others who would like to participate in the parade, please share this letter
with them. And if your group is unable to participate, please come and join the festivities
on the parade route!

Very truly yours,
Zoriana Zobniw
Secretary of Ukrainian Village Committee

2019 Ukrainian Village Parade Confirmation Form

JOIN THE FESTIVITIES! 9TH ANNUAL UKRAINIAN VILLAGE PARADE IS AUGUST 25, 2018

When: August 25, 2018

10 a.m. groups gather at State Road School lot
11 a.m. parade step off on State Road

Where: The parade route is on State Road, beginning at the State Road School lot to
Ukrainian Heritage Park.

How do I take part: Click here to download the parade participation form.
Please return it to Ukrainian Village Committee via mail or email by July 31, 2018.

Email: ukrainianvillageparade@gmail.com
Mail: PO Box 34084, Parma, Ohio 44134

Why: It’s a fun community event in the heart of Parma! Also you can win a prize! Once
again this year, we will be awarding a distinction to the most creative and colorful
participant in the parade. We encourage all participants to create floats, decorate cars,
and wear costumes and uniforms that are relevant to their specific organization or group.

Preparation: On Friday, August 17, 2018, a meeting will be held with representatives of
the participating parade units. The meeting will be at St. Josaphat Ukrainian Catholic
Cathedral Annex Building at 7:00 p.m. At this time, unit representatives will receive detailed parade instructions including their assigned staging area.

Point of Contact: If you need to speak with us directly, call or text Roman (614) 425-1309.

Email: ukrainianvillageparade@gmail.com
Facebook: https://facebook.com/UkrainianVillage

Thank you for supporting this major City of Parma annual event!

If you know of others who would like to participate in the parade, please share this letter
with them. And if your group is unable to participate, please come and join the festivities
on the parade route!

Very truly yours,
Zoriana Zobniw
Secretary of Ukrainian Village Committee

2018 Ukrainian Village Parade Confirmation Form

2018 Ukrainian Village Parade Flyer

Parma’s Ukrainian Village highlighted as neighborhood that is growing stronger, respects its past

Interesting new article highlighting the unique character of Parma’s Ukrainian Village, from the perspective of George Mount, a new Parma resident:

There’s an effort in Cleveland to recreate what it once was: a city of integrated neighborhoods valuing culture, family, and civic pride. But I often feel no sense of continuity with the past in these urban enclaves. Few of the hippest restaurants and coffee shops have been around for more than a few years. Emblematic of this difficulty to integrate the past are posh condominiums repurposed from closed schools and factories.

It’s great to breathe new life into these structures, but unfortunate that many longtime residents, likely alumni of West Tech or long-ago Eveready employees, can’t afford these luxury dwellings. This fracturing could make you wonder: can the neighborhoods of Cleveland grow stronger while respecting the past?

I believe the answer is “yes,” and the proof is right over the 480 bridge at State Road. It’s a place many urban pioneers reactively call the opposite of cool…

…Ukrainian Village, on the town’s northern border, is a classic inner-ring suburban neighborhood. Unlike many others, it is livable in its own right, proving that there is a way to combine old-world customs, livable neighborhoods, and affordable housing.

(excerpted from The Cleveland Neighborhood Guidebook )

Read the entire article at: http://beltmag.com/opposite-cool-parmas-ukrainian-village/

Good Olde Daze in Parma crowned NEO’s Best Wings’ People’s Choice champion

Good Olde Daze is located in Parma’s Ukrainian Village at 6001 State Road.

After two weeks of wing eaters wiping away sauce from their fingers to vote, the people of Northeast Ohio have named the wings at Good Olde Daze, 6001 State Road, Parma, as their favorite.

A total of 14,941 votes were cast in the NEO’s Best Wings’ People’s Choice division, and Good Olde Daze gobbled up 26.4 percent of them. Even the city of Parma got behind their local business and posted this video to the city’s Facebook page during the competition.

Three popular choices of wings at Good Olde Daze in Parma were buffalo, BBQ and garlic sauce.

Owner Tommy Shaver previously said his best sellers are either the wings or burgers. It has weekly specials, such as 50-cent wings on Thursdays. Click here to check out the menu.

Source: http://www.cleveland.com/neosbest/index.ssf/2015/02/good_olde_daze_in_parma_crowne.html

Ukrainians rally against Russian invasion of Crimea

Heartache for Ukraine.

Fresh-baked Lenten paczkis, Ukrainian-style, cooled on a counter inside Lviv International Foods Monday afternoon, near the samples of cured ham and kielbasa scattered on paper plates.

Preoccupied customers were slow to help themselves. Most were busy raising the issue of the moment–Russian troops in Ukraine–and what it was doing to their blood pressures and to their families.

“We’re all going crazy,” said Luda Popudnyk of Parma, a worried mother who stopped into the ethnic grocery in Parma’s Ukrainian Village.

“Everybody is tense,” she said. “Everybody’s afraid of everything. Nobody wants a war.”

That was the feeling in immigrant-owned businesses up and down State Road Monday, in a commercial district anchored by stately Ukrainian churches and cathedrals.

Many of those houses of worship have been scenes of hurried prayer vigils, community meetings and strategy sessions in recent weeks–ever since Kiev exploded in anti-government protests in mid January.

A recent change of government aroused Russian ire and Russian troops. Now the region’s Ukrainian American community, Ohio’s largest, is trying to respond to a crisis few saw coming.

Source: http://www.cleveland.com/business/index.ssf/2014/03/ukrainians_in_cleveland_rally.html

Shopping small is easy in Parma’s Ukrainian Village

Parma is ready for Small Business Saturday.

Shopping small at local independent businesses is easy to do in a place like Parma,” Mayor DeGeeter said. “Parma has Polish Village and Ukrainian Village and other business districts that cater to people looking for unique items to purchase. I look forward to seeing lots of folks out shopping that day.”

Small Business Saturday, a national campaign started in 2010 by American Express, was started to encourage consumers to include small and independent businesses in their holiday shopping, even if they shop national chains on Black Friday.

Source: http://www.cleveland.com/parma/index.ssf/2013/11/parma_is_ready_for_small_busin.html

Kolos Bakery celebrates first year in business in Ukrainian Village

About a year ago, Andro Dokhoian and his wife Nataliya opened a tiny bakery on State Road in Parma’s Ukrainian Village.

Kolos already smells like a nice bakery. It specializes in bread — white, wheat, various kinds of rye and sweet egg bread with raisins.

Dokhoian said his bread contains few ingredients. There are no shortenings, oleos or dough conditioners.

“There is nothing artificial in our bread,” Dokhoian said. “It’s baked the way my grandfather used to bake it. At that time, bakeries didn’t use any chemicals.

“If you go to a regular store and grab a loaf of bread from the shelf, read the ingredients,” Dokhoian said. “You will find there are at least 20 ingredients in the bread.”

Kolos also carries nut, poppy-seed, cinnamon, sweet-butter and plumb rolls, along with apple strudels, turnovers and 35 different types of cakes.

In addition, Kolos sells miniature pizzas. Dokhoian makes his own cheese for his cheese Danishes.

Kolos adds one or two products every month, based on customer demand, and the bakery takes special orders.

“Because we are a small bakery, we are very flexible,” Dokhoian said.

Kolos Bakery is located at 5346 State Rd in Parma’s Ukrainian Village.

Read more at: http://www.cleveland.com/parma/index.ssf/2012/12/parma_baker_celebrates_first_y.html

Immigrant musician took a chance opening International Food & Deli

International Food & Deli, opened with the slimmest of resources.

Sozanski, a violinist who once played for the philharmonic orchestra of Lviv, Ukraine, runs one of the busiest enterprises in the Ukrainian Village section of Parma. His grocery store and adjacent party center attract a multilingual crowd to offerings of Ukrainian pastas, German sausages, Polish polkas and, occasionally, rousing Cossack dances.

Regulars come in for the sausages and kielbasa draped from racks behind the counter, for the rich European-style cakes and tortes in the bakery case and for the mineral waters that spring from cherished fonts back home in eastern Europe.

Most members of the staff speak several languages, certainly Ukrainian. But English is common, too. Many of the customers are first- and second-generation Americans rediscovering the foods of their childhood.

International Food & Deli is located at 5850 State Road in Parma’s Ukrainian Village.

Read on at: http://www.cleveland.com/business/index.ssf/2012/12/risk_takers_immigrants_took_a.html

Garden club and Boy Scouts plant flowers in Ukrainian Heritage Park in Parma

Beautification underway in Parma’s Ukrainian Village.

The Ridgewood Garden Club of Parma and Boy Scouts Troop 221 planted 250 daffodil bulbs in Ukrainian Heritage Park on Oct. 22.

The park is on State Road in Parma.

Petitti Garden Centers and Royal Victorian Garden Center donated 150 bulbs and the garden club bought the rest.

Source: http://www.cleveland.com/parma/index.ssf/2012/11/garden_club_and_boy_scouts_pla.html