JOIN THE FESTIVITIES! 9TH ANNUAL UKRAINIAN VILLAGE PARADE IS AUGUST 25, 2018

When: August 25, 2018

10 a.m. groups gather at State Road School lot
11 a.m. parade step off on State Road

Where: The parade route is on State Road, beginning at the State Road School lot to
Ukrainian Heritage Park.

How do I take part: Click here to download the parade participation form.
Please return it to Ukrainian Village Committee via mail or email by July 31, 2018.

Email: ukrainianvillageparade@gmail.com
Mail: PO Box 34084, Parma, Ohio 44134

Why: It’s a fun community event in the heart of Parma! Also you can win a prize! Once
again this year, we will be awarding a distinction to the most creative and colorful
participant in the parade. We encourage all participants to create floats, decorate cars,
and wear costumes and uniforms that are relevant to their specific organization or group.

Preparation: On Friday, August 17, 2018, a meeting will be held with representatives of
the participating parade units. The meeting will be at St. Josaphat Ukrainian Catholic
Cathedral Annex Building at 7:00 p.m. At this time, unit representatives will receive detailed parade instructions including their assigned staging area.

Point of Contact: If you need to speak with us directly, call or text Roman (614) 425-1309.

Email: ukrainianvillageparade@gmail.com
Facebook: https://facebook.com/UkrainianVillage

Thank you for supporting this major City of Parma annual event!

If you know of others who would like to participate in the parade, please share this letter
with them. And if your group is unable to participate, please come and join the festivities
on the parade route!

Very truly yours,
Zoriana Zobniw
Secretary of Ukrainian Village Committee

2018 Ukrainian Village Parade Confirmation Form

2018 Ukrainian Village Parade Flyer

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Parma’s Ukrainian Village highlighted as neighborhood that is growing stronger, respects its past

Interesting new article highlighting the unique character of Parma’s Ukrainian Village, from the perspective of George Mount, a new Parma resident:

There’s an effort in Cleveland to recreate what it once was: a city of integrated neighborhoods valuing culture, family, and civic pride. But I often feel no sense of continuity with the past in these urban enclaves. Few of the hippest restaurants and coffee shops have been around for more than a few years. Emblematic of this difficulty to integrate the past are posh condominiums repurposed from closed schools and factories.

It’s great to breathe new life into these structures, but unfortunate that many longtime residents, likely alumni of West Tech or long-ago Eveready employees, can’t afford these luxury dwellings. This fracturing could make you wonder: can the neighborhoods of Cleveland grow stronger while respecting the past?

I believe the answer is “yes,” and the proof is right over the 480 bridge at State Road. It’s a place many urban pioneers reactively call the opposite of cool…

…Ukrainian Village, on the town’s northern border, is a classic inner-ring suburban neighborhood. Unlike many others, it is livable in its own right, proving that there is a way to combine old-world customs, livable neighborhoods, and affordable housing.

(excerpted from The Cleveland Neighborhood Guidebook )

Read the entire article at: http://beltmag.com/opposite-cool-parmas-ukrainian-village/

Immigrant musician took a chance opening International Food & Deli

International Food & Deli, opened with the slimmest of resources.

Sozanski, a violinist who once played for the philharmonic orchestra of Lviv, Ukraine, runs one of the busiest enterprises in the Ukrainian Village section of Parma. His grocery store and adjacent party center attract a multilingual crowd to offerings of Ukrainian pastas, German sausages, Polish polkas and, occasionally, rousing Cossack dances.

Regulars come in for the sausages and kielbasa draped from racks behind the counter, for the rich European-style cakes and tortes in the bakery case and for the mineral waters that spring from cherished fonts back home in eastern Europe.

Most members of the staff speak several languages, certainly Ukrainian. But English is common, too. Many of the customers are first- and second-generation Americans rediscovering the foods of their childhood.

International Food & Deli is located at 5850 State Road in Parma’s Ukrainian Village.

Read on at: http://www.cleveland.com/business/index.ssf/2012/12/risk_takers_immigrants_took_a.html

Lviv International Foods thrives on ethnic Easter traditions

Freshly shaved loaves of ham, salami and head cheese sit stacked high in the deli case at Lviv International Foods in Parma.

Any day looks like an ethnic holiday at this sparkling Ukrainian grocery store. And with the unusual concurrence this year of both Orthodox and non-Orthodox Easters this Sunday, things will only get busier.

She and her staff make a wide assortment of their own pierogi. They bake Vie de France bread from purchased dough several times a day, and will gladly explain to customers how they can make a torte from thin sheets of wafer and caramel sauce she sells by the can.

The meats are a long production: cooking and chilling a marinade, three to four days of soaking in the refrigerator, five hours of marinating with garlic and mayonnaise and three to four hours of cooking. For garlic lovers, the cooking aromas are almost as good as the taste of the transformed meat. It’s served with traditional beet relish made with horseradish, a kind of Ukrainian hot sauce.

The bread, made with an overabundance of eggs, is particularly important in conveying a sunny color to signify spring — as well as Easter’s celebratory, religious meaning of resurrection. It, too, sweetens the air in the home (and makes great French toast, if there’s any left).

This is also where you can buy your very own babushka (floral head scarf), coffee mugs printed with Ukrainian names, and baskets of pysanky, the ornately decorated eggs.

Lviv International Foods is located at 5689 State Road in Parma’s Ukrainian Village.

Source: http://www.cleveland.com/taste/index.ssf/2010/03/post_42.html